commentary by Patrick H. Moore

Opinions differ as to the validity of vigilante efforts in criminal matters and — for the most part — it’s probably a good thing that non-law-enforcement personnel are typically not in a position to mete out justice. Last June, however, in a rural area of Lafayette Parish, La., it was the family of kidnap victim Bethany Arceneaux, 29, of Duson, La, that rescued her from her abductor, Scott Thomas, in an abandoned house on the edge of a sugar cane field after law enforcement had searched for her fruitlessly for nearly two days. This is yet another true crime story in which the facts could easily be poured into a captivating crime novel.

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by Mike Roche

On July 31st, 1979, a bank teller in Florence, Kentucky, discovered a counterfeit twenty-dollar bill. The bank quickly alerted the U.S. Secret Service, who initiated an investigation. The Secret Service examined the bill and determined that based on its unique characteristics, there was a new printer manufacturing this fake money. By the end of 1980, over $30,000 worth of these particular counterfeit bills had been discovered in 38 states. In 1982, over $130,000 worth of counterfeit bills were tendered across 44 states. The technique used to pass the bills was consistent with many counterfeit operations. The counterfeit bills were used to purchase small items such as candy bars and the passer received genuine cash in return. The U.S. Secret Service labeled the case as the “The Mall Passer” because of the tendency to pass the counterfeit in shopping malls.

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by Michael Mills

From what I have read, Raffaele Sollecito’s defence team will be relying on the two statements made by Amdanda Knox in the early morning of 6 November 2007. In those statements, which Knox claims were coerced, she describes leaving Sollecito’s apartment after sending a message to Lumumba saying that she will “see him later”, and telling Sollecito that she is going to work as usual at Patrice Lumumba’s bar. She then describes meeting Lumumba, taking him to the house where she and Kercher lived, and then waiting in the kitchen while he had sexual intercourse with Kercher in her bedroom and then killed her for some unexplained reason.

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by BJW Nashe

The first two photographs in this post are courtesy of San Francisco-based photographer Frank Gaglione. You can see more of Frank’s work at his website.

The fact that some women and some men are strangely attracted to convicted serial killers, to the point of entering into relationships with them, and even occasionally marrying them, may lead you to question whatever faith in humanity you think you still possess. It’s an odd phenomenon that certainly makes for good copy. Indeed, the stories about individuals who have grown infatuated with Ted Bundy and Richard Ramirez tend to read like a darkly comedic Chuck Palahniuk novel.

What’s going on with these people?

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by Lise LaSalle

Convicted murderer and former Toronto police officer Richard Wills killed his former girlfriend Laviana Mariani in February 2002, and was found guilty of first-degree murder in 2007. He had desperately tried to delay justice and in 2004, he was even assessed by a psychiatrist in the hope of being declared not criminally responsible by reason of mental disorder. Instead of answering Wills’ prayers, the mental health specialist had determined that he was suffering from a narcissistic personality disorder and that he knew he was doing wrong when he killed his lover.

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commentary by Patrick H. Moore

We all know that as we get older, time seems to accelerate; one day follows hard on the heels of its precursor and a month may seem like a mere week or two. Looking back, I seem to recall that when I was in my twenties, the time seemed to pass at the slow pace of the moon, and a single workday could seem to drag on interminably.

But what about if you’re a young woman, now in your mid-twenties, and you’ve been facing murder charges for well over six years, and that you spent four of those years locked up in an Italian prison. What if you’re Seattle native Amanda Knox?

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by Lori

After reading our initial post on the Koystya Thyssen parental imprisonment case out of Dripping Springs, Texas, in which Koystya’s parents imprisoned the 22-year-old youth in a garage/shack for 4 years, ostensibly to protect the Thyssens’ other children and the community from the sexual threat he allegedly posed, our dedicated child advocate and foster parent Lori was kind enough to elaborate on how this troubled young man should have been handled.

I agree completely with Dr. Starks, the way this young man has been treated is just so wrong and has undoubtedly further damaged him. There is no way he seeing the type of “counselor” he needed (or even a licensed one).

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Wonders Never Cease! A federal judge has overturned the conviction of former New York City police officer Gilberto Valle, who was convicted by a jury in March 2013 based on accusations of him plotting to kidnap, kill and eat young women. He is being held at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan.

Yesterday, Judge Paul Gardephe ruled that there was insufficient evidence to support the conviction of Gilberto Valle.

In his 118 page opinion, Judge Gardephe stated in part: “The evidentiary record is such that it is more likely than not the case that all of Valle’s Internet communications about kidnapping are fantasy role-play.”

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by BJW Nashe

“Getting away with murder” now serves as a euphemism for avoiding the consequences of just about any kind of bad behavior. In its most literal sense, however, the phrase points to an especially troubling phenomenon — serial killings committed by psychopaths who somehow manage to avoid being caught and convicted of their crimes. The Zodiac Killer, who terrified the San Francisco Bay Area in the late 1960s and early 1970s with a string of murders accompanied by bizarre cryptograms and letters to the press, is probably the most famous murderer who was never captured. The Zodiac is not alone, however.  Our recent history is littered with unsolved mass murders. The following rogue’s gallery — presented in no particular order, since they are all equally hideous — lists some of the ones who got away with the worst crimes imaginable.

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by Patrick H. Moore

On June 17, 2013, Cameron Langford of AlterNet reported that Texas jailers at the Live Oak County Jail were sued by two former female inmates because they ran a “rape camp” where they “repeatedly raped and humiliated female inmates,” and forced them to masturbate and sodomize male guards, and one another.

The former inmates J.A.S. and J.M.N. brought a civil action in Federal court against Live Oak County and its former jailers Vincent Aguilar, Israel Charles Jr. and Jaime E. Smith.

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