by Mike Roche

Exhibit I: The Killing of John Lennon

In the darkness of a cold December night, the assassin waited for his prey to return home. He watched in silence as the limousine dropped off the celebrity couple in front of their exclusive apartment building. As the couple approached, the killer drew his weapon, and at the opportune moment, he fired five shots. Four of his shots struck his victim who slumped to the ground and succumbed to his mortal wounds. The killer paced about nervously — then extracted a book from his back pocket and read seemingly dissociated from the murder he had just committed.

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by BJW Nashe

These days, if you’re going to start robbing banks or convenience stores, you need to put some effort into personal style and fashion. You are certain to be caught on surveillance video at some point during your escapades. Soon your appearance will be on the Internet for all to see–much like celebrities who grace the red carpets of awards shows. So there’s no excuse to neglect the fashion component of your criminal activity.

Lately we have seen criminals exploring a wide variety of styles — from glamorous cross-dressing to casual grunge to silly disguises — with varying degrees of success. No matter what, they have definitely been turning heads at the FBI. Here are some notable examples:

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commentary by Patrick H. Moore

In a rather interesting case, a British businessman, Shrien Dewani, was arrested in December of 2010 for allegedly hiring a hit man to kill his wife, Anni Dewani, in South Africa during their honeymoon just two weeks after they were married. Surpassingly strange, you say? Indeed. But it is nonetheless a fact that newly-wed husbands do occasionally murder their freshly-ringed wives (or in some cases arrange to have them murdered). Take for instance, the recent case of the Terre Haute, Indiana doctor, George “Scott” Samson, who shot and killed his wife, a lovely nurse named Kelly Ecker, immediately after their wedding reception because she ran up some bills on one of his credit cards.

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by Darcia Helle

In 1870, New Orleans was a city divided by politics, class, and race. The Civil War had left much of the south reeling, and now the government’s Radical Reconstruction attempted to force change by integrating the black population into the white-dominated hierarchy. Some whites rebelled, clinging to their Confederate roots, while others who supported the change suffered ridicule and disdain within their community. The atmosphere was tumultuous. Racism was not only openly practiced but encouraged.

Former United States Supreme Court Justice John Campbell, who resigned in order to join the Confederacy, illustrates this point well. He had this to say to his fellow New Orleanians: “We have Africans in place all about us, they are jurors, post office clerks, custom house officers & day by day they barter away their obligations and duties.”

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commentary by Patrick H. Moore

From 1991 through 2011, the violent crime rate in the U.S. either dropped or remained stable. Recently, however, the statistics have shown that the 20-year trend toward safe streets and secure homes could be coming coming to an end. Between 2011 and 2012, the violent-crime rate rose 15 percent, based on data from the annual National Crime Victimization Survey. I suspect that even without the statistics some of us had the feeling that the violent crime rate was rising. And more and more of these horrific assaults and slayings seem to be the “handiwork” of the mentally troubled. As if we needed any more proof of this sobering trend, a particularly abhorrent mass murder occurred on a Saturday night in October of last year in Sunset Park in Brooklyn where a mentally-ill 25-year-old named Mingdong Chen turned a normal family home into a slaughterhouse killing a mother and her four young children.

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commentary by Patrick H. Moore

The law is a funny animal and no matter how hard its pundits and practitioners try to “get it right”, it will always have quirks that stagger the mind of the bemused observer. Take the laws concerning rape and murder in the great State of Pennsylvania.

Let’s say a true miscreant decides to rape some poor hapless victim and then murder him or her to conceal the evidence. The rape prior to the murder would be seen as an aggravating factor that would allow the prosecutors to seek the death penalty. On the other hand, suppose the miscreant murders the victim first and then rapes the corpse as a result of bizarre necrophilia-type urges. Oddly enough, under Pennsylvania law (and many other states), abuse of a corpse including sexual desecration merely rises to the level of a misdemeanor and thus would not result in any possibility that the perpetrator would face the death penalty.

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The following 10 somewhat bizarre yet prophetically fatal facts about Ted Bundy (Monster Smooth) during his youth and young adulthood come to us from Bukisa.com and Wikipedia. Bukisa’s interpretations of these facts have been, in some cases, augmented and/or reinterpreted by Patrick H. Moore.

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compiled by Patrick H. Moore

John Wrana died in July of 2013 at the age of 95. Over 65 years ago, Mr. Wrana served in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He fought in India and Burma and was shot down once. At the time of his Honorable Discharge, he had been promoted to sergeant. Although he lived in a Chicago assisted living home, Mr. Wrana did not die a natural death. Rather, the World War II veteran died after being shot a second time with a Taser and bean bag rounds fired by police because he was allegedly threatening the staff. His family adamantly insist that he was killed unnecessarily.

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commentary by Patrick H. Moore

What is life but a constant setting, juggling and readjusting of priorities? After my daughter had been away at college for four weeks we received an aggrieved phone call from her in which she insisted she wanted to change schools next year. “Why after a mere four weeks?” we inquired. Simple. She didn’t like the priorities of her fellow freshman whose only ambition seems to be to smoke weed on a hillside not far from her hillside campus. We told her to hang in there and to not let their feckless priorities interfere with hers. Happily, she’s stuck to her guns and is doing well and has apparently abandoned her desire to transfer.

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by BJW Nashe

Sid Vicious and Nancy Spungen’s death-trip punk romance culminated in her murder in October, 1978, followed by his death from a heroin overdose in early 1979. For thirty years, the prevailing view held that Sid, the troubled Sex Pistols’ bassist, was the one who fatally stabbed Nancy in their room at Manhattan’s infamous Chelsea Hotel. In 2009, a documentary film called Who Killed Nancy? was released, which drew upon “new evidence” to show that Vicious was most likely innocent of the murder. Several news outlets followed up with stories questioning the established version of events. The main point was that Sid was too incapacitated from drugs to kill anyone on the night of Nancy’s death, so comatose from the massive dose of sedatives (30 Tuinals) he had gobbled that he couldn’t even lift a knife, let alone stab anyone.

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