commentary by Patrick H. Moore

It’s been three years now since Casey Anthony was acquitted of first degree murder in the death of her daughter, Caylee Anthony. On this anniversary of her acquittal, Florida criminal defense attorney Cheney Mason, who is writing a book about the case and who worked pro bono on Ms. Anthony’s defense team, has made a number of rather fascinating, and perhaps controversial, remarks about both the case and Ms. Anthony herself.

chen2It is noted that Mason , a former president of the Florida Association of Criminal Lawyers, had been disgusted at that time of the trial because the conviction-hungry media had not only worked overtime to drum up anti-Casey Anthony vitriol, but had also gone after her lawyer, the relatively inexperienced Jose Baez, with all the delicacy of a mastodon gumming a hairy mammoth to death in a Siberian tar pit.

Jean Casarez of edition.cnn.com writes:

I sat down with Mason exclusively to talk with him about his new book, “Justice in America.” In it, he insists that the jury got it right, and the rest of the country had it wrong.

Baez started asking Mason, a Florida death penalty qualified attorney, for advice. That propelled Mason to want to meet Anthony. He remembers going to the Orange County jail to introduce himself.

chen10“They brought her to the room, and I have to tell you I was really surprised to see how small she is … how tiny she is. I stood looking at a child herself. I said this can’t be,” he said.

“Could she look you in the eye?” I asked.

“Oh yes,” Mason responded, describing her demeanor as quiet, afraid and unsure.

Mason explains that after meeting Anthony, with her approval, he decided to join the team pro bono.

Mason reports that just before jury selection, he “got word that Anthony’s handwritten letters describing sexual abuse at the hands of her father were going to be made public under Florida’s open records law.”

chen12In his interview with Jean Casarez, Mason explained that he believed it was only right to warn Anthony’s parents, George and Cindy.

“We had them one at a time come into my personal office and made the announcement: ‘Monday’s going to be a bad day for you George. I felt man to man I would tell you in advance.””

Mason said George Anthony’s reaction was “basically none.” “He looked at me … I turned sideways a little bit, he clapped his hands down on his thighs — let out a big sigh but didn’t say anything,” Mason said.

“He never admitted doing anything,” Mason said. “All we had were the letters and (separately) the statements Casey had made to the psychiatrist.”

chen13Mason recounts that Cindy Anthony’s reaction was quite different and that upon being informed of Attorney Baez’s plans, she became very emotional and wept.

Nonetheless, Mason was shocked when during his opening statement, Jose Baez told the jury that his client was a victim of sexual abuse by her father. Mason was also concerned because he felt that Anthony’s defense team could not possibly chen14prove the allegation unless George Anthony confessed to the alleged child abuse while on the witness stand, which of course he did not, denying it emphatically when questioned by Assistant State Attorney Jeff Ashton.

The prosecution spent weeks attempting and failing to build its case before finally resting on June 15, 2011. When it was Anthony’s team’s turn, they maintained that Caylee was not murdered but rather drowned in the Anthony’s above-ground pool, and that Casey and her father then panicked and covered up the child’s death. George Anthony, of course, denied that in his testimony and as for Casey Anthony, she stated:

“I didn’t kill my daughter.”

As the case ground along, the prosecutors, apparently fearing it was losing, did what prosecutors often do in such situations; they proposed a plea agreement and Anthony was approached with the possibility.

“Casey got very angry about that. She got very angry to hear talk about it. She didn’t want to hear it,” Mason said. “Casey would fight it ’til her last breath. She didn’t kill her daughter.”

chen9In his interview, Mason opined that it took plenty of courage and strength for Anthony to refuse to even discuss the possibility of a plea agreement, considering that if convicted of first degree murder, given the incendiary nature of the case, she might very well have received the death penalty.

Finally, on July 5, 2011, after deliberating for 10 hours, the jurors announced they had reached a verdict.

“She was holding her breath like a deep sea diver, waiting as we all were,” Mason said.

As is now part of true crime history, Anthony was acquitted of the most serious charges, including first-degree murder, aggravated child abuse and aggravated manslaughter of a child. She was convicted on four misdemeanors for providing false information to law enforcement officers.

* * * * *

chen6Although Anthony has been one of the most reviled defendants in American trial history, based in part on her flamboyant, party-hearty lifestyle during the six-week period in which search crews searched for her daughter’s remains, she now appears to be a sadder, wiser and more thoughtful person.

Due to the public hate and continued threats on her life, she currently lives in an undisclosed location in Florida and doesn’t leave her residence.

“She has to live constantly on guard. She can’t go out in public,” Mason said.

Sequestered in her secret location, Anthony reportedly supports herself by doing clerk and secretarial work.

“I think Casey has a lot of world left to have to deal with. She hasn’t been freed from her incarceration yet ’cause she can’t go out. She can’t go to a beauty parlor, she can’t go shopping to a department store, she can’t go to a restaurant, she can’t even go to McDonald’s. She can’t do anything,” Mason said.

Image:Mason and his wife, Shirley, have continued their relationship with Anthony.

Mason explains that Anthony really “does not have any blood family anymore.” Although she may have had a few conversations with her mother, according to Mason, they do not have a “relationship”, and, unsurprisingly, she has no relationship with her father.

If Anthony has a real friend, it is probably Shirley Mason:

“I’m a cross between a friend, a mother, but not a mother — only someone who is older who has had experience in the world she has not had,” she said.

“My hope for her is it gets better for her and the world or the people who have been so hateful can let that go and they can move on,” she said.

Anthony “tries to make her life work,” Shirley Mason said. She takes care of herself and stays physically fit by working out in the house.

Although Anthony declined CNN’s request for an interview, Cheney Mason believes that she “wants to speak out”, so perhaps one day, when the time is right, she will “face the nation”.

* * * * *

chenA sad girl now a sad young woman living a sad life. Sad that her daughter Caylee died an accidental death and sad that it was covered up, which, of course led to the theatrical circus that ensued.

It’s also sad and tragic that Caylee Anthony had her life snuffed out by unforgiving water at such a young age, especially given that based on Casey Anthony’s apparent new-found maturity, it’s entirely possible that she would be a decent mother now if her daughter was still alive.

I have been working with criminal defense attorneys for nearly 11 years now. Some of them are very good; some of them are mediocre; and some of them combine true expertise with caring and compassion. Although Cheney Mason appears to obviously love the limelight and is not above trying to make money through the publication of his book on the Anthony trial, he does seem to care about Casey Anthony at this point.

Update:

I have been taken to task for falling for Cheney Mason’s “rap” and am probably guilty of naivete. I was not aware that he was originally of the belief that Casey Anthony was guilty of murdering her daughter. My bad. With respect to the book he is publishing, it is my experience that most lawyers will not write about the cases they are involved in and it certainly suggests a desire on Mason’s part to cash in on the notoriety of the case. On the other hand, I am not convinced that Mason does not take a fatherly interest in Anthony at this point.

Until I am proven wrong, however, I stick to my perhaps naive belief that Anthony is probably a better person, post-trial, than she was before  all this happened. However, I obviously cannot prove this.

 

60 Responses to A Sadder and Wiser Casey Anthony Now Lives the Life of a Hermit (Updated)

  1. Pat says:

    She’s not a hermit don’t drink the kool aid Cheney is dishing out to ‘sell’ his book.. She lives here in Sarasota Fla with the rest of the rich folks & as far as McDonalds goes I don’t think the clerks at their drive-ups care who’s behind the wheel as long as they pay.. Don’t buy what Cheney is selling on his ‘buy my book’ tour just drumming up the bucks for himself & TotMom.. Media & Cheney in same boat all about the bucks.. Has Cheney forgotten little Caylee Marie who can’t go out in public either..

    • PatrickHMoore says:

      THX for commenting, Watching!The truth may be somewhere in between your take and Cheney Mason’s. There’s little doubt that Anthony’s life is no longer the party hearty mindless existence it once was. She no doubt pays the price everyday for being careless with her daughter, assuming that’s what happened.

      • liselasalle says:

        She has no blood relative left Patrick because they were all thrown under the bus by this Liar’s Club who encouraged her lies instead of teaching her to accept responsibility.

        • PatrickHMoore says:

          Well, by accusing George of molestation, she walked down the road of no return. Of course, only Dad and Casey and Cindy and perhaps a few others would no for sure if this really happened.

  2. Personally I would love to hear the truth but I’m sure that will never happen. I haven’t read the other books written on this case and will not read this one either.

  3. Santos says:

    The whole premise of her defense was asinine – who covers up an accident to make it look like a murder? The little girl drown in the family pool, then either George or Casey wrapped duct tape around her mouth, wrapped her in garbage bags & dumped her in a swamp? I’m not buying it. All evidence, circumstantial or not, points to Casey Anthony as the person who snuffed out the life of her daughter. I won’t be buying Cheney Mason’s book, that’s for sure.

  4. liselasalle says:

    Wow Cheney Mason, the man who went on TV to declare Anthony guilty and joined the team for publicity afterwards.

    In her letters from jail, Anthony talks about a dream that maybe her father was abusing her like her brother did but she was not sure. So now it is fact…
    The only thing I know for sure about Casey Anthony is that she was a liar.

    I wish her a good life but this guy should shut up. To him, it is all about winning.

    • PatrickHMoore says:

      I think you’re right that it’s all about winning for Cheney but that is the nature of a defense attorney. That’s what they’re hired to do…win. Is he an opportunist? No doubt? Is he after the bucks? Yes? Is he supportive of Anthony at this point? He appears to be…

      • liselasalle says:

        I am sorry Patrick but some defense attorneys do not accuse fathers of sexual abuse to get their client out.

        It is about winning and not about lying. They knew the facts and accusing George was such a low blow knowing how she lied all the time and that she came up with this lame half-baked story because she had no way out. But I will admit that without the ridiculous death penalty on the table, they might have been less desperate.

        • PatrickHMoore says:

          I’m pretty sure that most defense attorneys would not stoop that low… In fact, based on my experience very few would…

          At this point though, and I may be totally misguided, I feel some sympathy for Casey Anthony. She is a sad person living a sad life and her daughter is dead, probably due to her negligence and she has to live with that the rest of her life… How could one not feel a certain sympathy for her? Yet I realize that many, perhaps most, feel no sympathy for her whatsoever. I may just be a sucker… SMH (at myself).

          • liselasalle says:

            I don’t know if I feel sympathy for her because I don’t know how her life really is.

            Does she need our sympathy?

            She has escaped life in prison and is surrounded by people helping her. Her freedom is limited but she still can breathe fresh air and interact with people in the free world.

          • PatrickHMoore says:

            I don’t know what she needs but I do feel sympathy for her. Perhaps it’s simply part of my naive but basically kind nature.

            I have learned, however, to distrust my emotions, because they often lead me down the wrong path.

      • Mile says:

        Defense Attorneys were created to ensure Justice was carried out equally and fairly. That their client wasn’t railroaded. There was a time when courtrooms were a search for the truth, yes? Now, it is treated like a sport: Win or lose at all costs. Truth? Nobody cares about truth anymore.

  5. Starks Shrink says:

    It’s odd that by publishing this book – Mason is thrusting Anthony back into the limelight and reducing any chance she has of the normal life he opines that she has been denied.

  6. I do not feel one bit sorry for her she is a liar and murdered her daughter and worst of all GOT AWAY WITH IT..I will never buy his book and it makes my skin crawl to hear both he and Baez talk about her being innocent,,also asking if she could look him in the eyes ..Of course she could..she always looked people in the eyes while she lied..what kind of lawyers are these

  7. Rick says:

    Patrick – I must say that I fall into the “non-sympathy” camp as to Anthony, probably because she got away with murder and any prison in which she finds herself is of her own making. I am also embarrassed by the “win-at-any-cost” attitude of many of my fellow defense lawyers, like Baez and Mason. To put on highly-questionable, uncorroborated testimony of alleged sexual abuse by Casey’s father? Really? No wonder why a large percentage of the public views attorneys and judges and politicians with scorn.

    • PatrickHMoore says:

      Well, she did do quite a stretch in prison while her trial was pending. Both prosecutors and defense attorneys regularly engage in win at all cost representation.

      I wonder if the alleged sexual abuse claim was more to gain sympathy for Anthony than in an attempt to really prove it.

      But in this imperfect world, isn’t if better for one guilty party to be acquitted than for innocent parties to be be convicted, which as we know happens all the time. But of course, two wrongs don’t make a right.

      For reasons I don’t fully understand, I feel a certain sympathy for Anthony. I may be the only person in the US to feel that way.

      • Lori says:

        I’m in the “non-sympathy” camp as well. I think it’s over and she should be left alone, but as far as sympathy goes, she appears to have enough self-pity to suffice.

      • Rick says:

        Patrick – You’re surely not the only Anthony sympathizer in the U.S.; she undoubtedly has many males admirers who are smitten with femme fatales.

        • PatrickHMoore says:

          We haven’t met up with any today though one fellow one Twitter really liked the post.

          • liselasalle says:

            Some people believe she is innocent Patrick. But I have a hard time understanding your sympathy when this girl had the best legal team, jury consultant and an acquittal. She unloaded her financial burden, threw her own family under the bus and she still has the help of heavy hitters and the media has not reported on her in a long time. Maybe she has to be private but she should thank her Lucky star.

            Plus, we have no clue as to her actual lifestyle.

            I will keep my sympathy for the ones in jail or mistreated by the system.

          • PatrickHMoore says:

            As I said in another comment, my sympathy is emotional, not rational. Rationally, I realize there’s little, if any, reason to feel sympathy for her.

  8. Santos says:

    Basically, Cheney Mason is harboring a criminal and profiting off of her crimes – the murder of a 2 year old little girl. Gee, what a nice guy!

  9. emmett says:

    patrick you sound like one of those serial killer groupies

  10. Scatter says:

    Wow Patrick………I must admit I was waiting for the sardonic twist at the end of the story. But it never came. And I’m left somewhat befuddled by that.

    To believe that Casey’s daughter drowned accidentally, then was stuffed in a bag with her mouth taped over? Of all the things I would do to a dead body, especially one that met an accidental end, the last things I would do would be to stuff the corpse in a bag………and tape its mouth.

    Why precisely would one tape the mouth of a dead person? To rid it of unsightly upper lip hair as an aid to the mortician? To silence it during potential future seances?

    Seriously my friend, you’ve gone completely off the rails here.

    • Rick says:

      Patrick – Much as I hate to admit it, I believe that Scatter has raised a good point here. If Caylee truly died in a drowning accident, why would the mother have treated her body in such an undignified manner and deprived her of a memorial service? Just as some Tea Baggers suffer from Obama Derangement Syndrome, I fear that you may be headed that direction as to Casey Anthony. :)

      • PatrickHMoore says:

        She was acquitted at trial by a journey of her peers. Apparently that means nothing. Furthermore, you don’t have a shred of evidence that Casey Anthony did the taping. And if she had taped up her daughter’s mouth, don’t you think she would have removed it after the dirty work was over to deflect suspicion from herself?

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_of_Caylee_Anthony

        On December 11, 2008, Caylee’s skeletal remains were found with a blanket inside a trash bag in a wooded area near the family home.[3][4] Investigative reports and trial testimony alternated between duct tape being found near the front of the skull[5] and on the mouth of the skull.[3][6][7][8] The medical examiner mentioned duct tape as one reason she ruled the death a homicide, but officially listed it as “death by undetermined means”.[9]

        The trial lasted six weeks, from May to July 2011. The prosecution sought the death penalty[10] and alleged Casey wished to free herself from parental responsibilities and murdered her daughter by administering chloroform and applying duct tape. The defense team, led by Jose Baez, countered that the child had drowned accidentally in the family’s swimming pool on June 16, 2008, and that George Anthony disposed of the body. The defense contended that Casey lied about this and other issues because of a dysfunctional upbringing, which they said included sexual abuse by her father. The defense did not present evidence as to how Caylee died, nor evidence that Casey was sexually abused as a child,[11] but challenged every piece of the prosecution’s evidence, calling much of it “fantasy forensics”.[12] Casey did not testify. On July 5, 2011, the jury found Casey not guilty of first degree murder, aggravated child abuse, and aggravated manslaughter of a child, but guilty of four misdemeanor counts of providing false information to a law enforcement officer.[13] With credit for time served, she was released on July 17, 2011. A Florida appeals court overturned two of the misdemeanor convictions on January 25, 2013.[14][15]

        The not guilty murder verdict was greeted with public outrage, and was both attacked and defended by media and legal commentators. Some complained that the jury misunderstood the meaning of reasonable doubt,[16] while others said the prosecution relied too heavily on the defendant’s allegedly poor moral character because they had been unable to show conclusively how the victim had died.[17] Time magazine described the case as “the social media trial of the century”.[18]

        There was a gender gap in perceptions to the case. According to a USA Today/Gallup Poll of 1,010 respondents, about two-thirds of Americans (64 percent) believed Casey Anthony “definitely” or “probably” murdered her daughter; however, women were much more likely than men to believe the murder charges against Anthony and to be upset by the not-guilty verdict. The poll reported that women were more than twice as likely as men, 28 percent versus 11 percent, to think Anthony “definitely” committed murder. Twenty-seven percent of women said they were angry about the verdict, compared with nine percent of men.[142][143] On the day Casey Anthony was sentenced for lying to investigators in the death of her daughter, supporters and protesters gathered outside the Orange County Courthouse, with one man who displayed a sign asking Anthony to marry him. Two men who drove overnight from West Virginia held signs that said, “We love and support you Casey Anthony,” and “Nancy Grace, stop trying to ruin innocent lives. The jury has spoken. P.S. Our legal system still works!”[144] The gender gap has partly been explained by “the maternal instinct”. The idea of a mother murdering her own child is a threat to the ideal of motherhood.[142][143] For example, the trial was compared to the 1960s Alice Crimmins trial, who was accused of murdering her two small children.[145][146]

        • Rick says:

          Patrick – I believe that you may have inadvertently slipped up — a jury of Casey’s peers did indeed engage on an circuitous “journey” in choosing to acquit her. Calling Dr. Freud. :)

      • liselasalle says:

        Rick, as usual your comment made me laugh out loud. Believing that Caylee drowned in the pool is like believing that OJ will be the next President.

        • Rick says:

          Lise – Don’t give the GOP any ideas!! After that clown car of a lineup that they fielded in the 2012 primary (Rick (“Man on Dog”) Santorum, Rick (“Scary”) Perry, Herman (“Godfather”) Cain, and Michelle (“Bat-Crap Crazy”) Bachmann), the GOP just might be desperate enough to draft OJ as their standard-bearer. They’d have no problem springing OJ from jail by enlisting the assistance of the Supreme Court, led by John (“I Only Call Balls and Strikes”) Roberts, as they have the Catholic Phalangist Five (no offense intended to real Catholics) in their back pocket.

    • PatrickHMoore says:

      She was acquitted at trial by a journey of her peers. Apparently that means nothing.

      From Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_of_Caylee_Anthony

      On December 11, 2008, Caylee’s skeletal remains were found with a blanket inside a trash bag in a wooded area near the family home.[3][4] Investigative reports and trial testimony alternated between duct tape being found near the front of the skull[5] and on the mouth of the skull.[3][6][7][8] The medical examiner mentioned duct tape as one reason she ruled the death a homicide, but officially listed it as “death by undetermined means”.[9]

      The trial lasted six weeks, from May to July 2011. The prosecution sought the death penalty[10] and alleged Casey wished to free herself from parental responsibilities and murdered her daughter by administering chloroform and applying duct tape. The defense team, led by Jose Baez, countered that the child had drowned accidentally in the family’s swimming pool on June 16, 2008, and that George Anthony disposed of the body. The defense contended that Casey lied about this and other issues because of a dysfunctional upbringing, which they said included sexual abuse by her father. The defense did not present evidence as to how Caylee died, nor evidence that Casey was sexually abused as a child,[11] but challenged every piece of the prosecution’s evidence, calling much of it “fantasy forensics”.[12] Casey did not testify. On July 5, 2011, the jury found Casey not guilty of first degree murder, aggravated child abuse, and aggravated manslaughter of a child, but guilty of four misdemeanor counts of providing false information to a law enforcement officer.[13] With credit for time served, she was released on July 17, 2011. A Florida appeals court overturned two of the misdemeanor convictions on January 25, 2013.[14][15]

      The not guilty murder verdict was greeted with public outrage, and was both attacked and defended by media and legal commentators. Some complained that the jury misunderstood the meaning of reasonable doubt,[16] while others said the prosecution relied too heavily on the defendant’s allegedly poor moral character because they had been unable to show conclusively how the victim had died.[17] Time magazine described the case as “the social media trial of the century”.[18]

      “They searched and found the remains of a child in a trash bag.[3] Investigative teams recovered duct tape which was hanging from Caylee’s hair and some tissue left on her skull.[3] Over the next four days, more bones were found in the wooded area near the spot where the remains initially had been discovered.[3][36][37][38] On December 19, 2008, medical examiner Dr. Jan Garavaglia confirmed that the remains found were those of Caylee Anthony. The death was ruled a homicide and the cause of death listed as undetermined.[39]”

      There was a gender gap in perceptions to the case. According to a USA Today/Gallup Poll of 1,010 respondents, about two-thirds of Americans (64 percent) believed Casey Anthony “definitely” or “probably” murdered her daughter; however, women were much more likely than men to believe the murder charges against Anthony and to be upset by the not-guilty verdict. The poll reported that women were more than twice as likely as men, 28 percent versus 11 percent, to think Anthony “definitely” committed murder. Twenty-seven percent of women said they were angry about the verdict, compared with nine percent of men.[142][143] On the day Casey Anthony was sentenced for lying to investigators in the death of her daughter, supporters and protesters gathered outside the Orange County Courthouse, with one man who displayed a sign asking Anthony to marry him. Two men who drove overnight from West Virginia held signs that said, “We love and support you Casey Anthony,” and “Nancy Grace, stop trying to ruin innocent lives. The jury has spoken. P.S. Our legal system still works!”[144] The gender gap has partly been explained by “the maternal instinct”. The idea of a mother murdering her own child is a threat to the ideal of motherhood.[142][143] For example, the trial was compared to the 1960s Alice Crimmins trial, who was accused of murdering her two small children.[145][146]

      • Rick says:

        Patrick – Just because the jury acquitted Casey does not mean that she is “innocent.” Also, in the court of public opinion, I regard Casey as a lucky person who got away with murder, much like O.J., albeit with less savagery and blood. So to answer your question, Casey’s acquittal has legal significance but does not compel me to accept that verdict as the correct one or to view her as innocent.

        • PatrickHMoore says:

          So true. Personally, I don’t have an opinion one way or the other as to whether Anthony killed the poor toddler. I hope she did not. Because I’m pretty comfortable with uncertainly, perhaps because I studied deconstruction and post-structuralism extensively in college from about 1984 to 1990, I don’t usually form opinions on guilt or innocence in capital cases unless the evidence is quite clear.

          Ir appears to me that in the Harris, case, the prosecution may have pretty solid evidence but time will tell.

          • Scatter says:

            Oh……she was acquitted by a jury of her peers? Like Lizzie Borden? OJ? The LAPD officers who beat Rodney King to a pulp on videotape? R. Kelly?
            Andrea Yeats? Lorena Bobbitt? Robert Blake?

            Yeah, that whole “acquitted by a jury of her peers” thing is pretty bulletproof.

          • PatrickHMoore says:

            She may be guilty of murder and she may not. Neither you nor I know for sure. Personally, I don’t strive for certainty in cases like this where psychologically the suspect seems like they may well be guilty, but there’s insufficient evidence to convict. I’m also aware that several (perhaps most) of the jurors wanted to convict but knew they could not because the evidence was lacking. The prosecution was unable to prove their case beyond a reasonable doubt and the jury did the proper thing and acquitted… By the way, most if not all of the officers in the Rodney King case did prison time. It’s a very important case in Federal jurisprudence: “United States vs. Koon”.

            I realize that you’re frustrated because you feel that Anthony literally got away with murder but it’s just a feeling, a hunch, a belief. You don’t know for sure… Only Anthony knows for sure and possibly her father and/or mother. Am I right or am I wrong, Sir Scatter?

          • Scatter says:

            Playing a little fast and loose with the facts here,aren’t we Patrick? The officers were acquitted on the State level by a jury of their peers. This travesty led to a tiny backlash which put parts of Los Angeles in flames for days, as well as causing further incidents of brutality. You know, that LA Riots thingy.

            Only AFTER they were acquitted by a jury of their peers and LA was left in shambles did the Feds step into the breach. The Federal attempt to rectify an erroneous acquittal has no bearing on the discussion.

            Remember, I was responding to your insistence that Anthony’s acquittal by a jury of her peers held some sort of intrinsic worth.

            I’m looking forward to future responses where you detail the intrinsic worth of the acquittals in the other cases referenced. After all, you made the inference that acquittal actually held meaning for Anthony….therefore, consistency demands that the acquittal of OJ and Blake and The LA Cops and the others has the same meaning.

            Actually….since the LA cops WERE acquitted by a jury of their peers,
            and you seem to assign some sort of value to that sort of thing, I would think that you would be outraged at the Feds stepping in after the fact, since that effectively nullified the acquittals. It seems as if the Feds actually took my position in reference to the value of those acquittals…….and leaves you here opposing your own stated position. Or is it only the acquittal of hotties that fire your righteous indignation?

            And no, I’m not frustrated by the fact that 12 jurors may well be hampered by an inept prosecution, a greasy defense team, or their own collective ineptitude in reaching a verdict reflective of the facts presented. It’s the price we pay for the system we’ve instituted, which is easily the best humanity has to offer. I might be if I felt that acquittal had any intrinsic value in the question of guilt or innocence. I do not, Prince Patrick.

          • PatrickHMoore says:

            Why are you so antagonistic? The LA cops were obviously guilty in the Rodney King case. Thank god the Feds stepped in. I believe O.J. was probably guilty and I know little about the Blake case.

            But I have no wish to continue this debate on Anthony. You know where I stand. I believe the evidence did not support a beyond a reasonable doubt guilty verdict. I do not know whether or not she murdered Caylee. I hope she did not but I do not have a crystal ball. Either do you. Nuff said.

          • Scatter says:

            Ah, the limitations of this medium. I thought I detected a note or two of antagonism in your reply and responded accordingly. If I misinterpreted your intent, I sincerely apologize Patrick. I have to say I was taken aback by what I perceived in your replies, and should have contacted you privately about it before forming my response.

          • PatrickHMoore says:

            No problem, Scatter. You’re a good writer and are obviously intelligent. You also know cases very well so just in case you’re interested, you’re more than welcome to writes for All Things Crime Blog should you so desire.

            Best regards,

            Patrick

          • Scatter says:

            I appreciate your kindness Patrick. I’m afraid I’m too traumatized to write, however. My last writing assignment was in 3rd grade, and it was an essay on how I spent my summer vacation.

            I poured my heart and soul into that tome. I studied the subtleties of syntax, I tore through Roget’s Thesaurus, I used figures of speech not employed since Wilde….it was a masterpiece.

            My sole miscalculation was my failure to realize that other children did not spend their summer vacations at the Westboro Baptist Church Bible Camp.

            Needless to say, neither my teacher (Mrs Goldfarb), nor my principal (Mr Santiago) found my dissertation on all I had learned that summer the least bit acceptable.

            Of course, I have long since disavowed all I heard at Camp, but I have never again been able to undertake a writing assignment of any kind. I just can’t. It’s too soon. ;)

          • PatrickHMoore says:

            Too funny…

          • Lori says:

            Scatter is too funny. And witty. And sarcastic. Can we keep him Patrick? Please, please, can we?

          • PatrickHMoore says:

            He’s on board if he wants to be even though he nearly drove me crazy over that damned Anthony woman.

          • Rick says:

            Scatter — You initially had me LMFAO with what I perceived to be your tongue-in-cheek comments. But then, I asked myself: what if there really is a Westboro Baptist Bible Church Summer camp that Scatter attended? If so, Lord have mercy on you. Such a horrendous experience would almost be certain to turn a believer into an atheist. :)

  11. Starks Shrink says:

    I’m sorry but I had to laugh at the Prince Patrick comment. Sorry Patrick, you have my utmost respect but that was funny! Oh and I agree that Blake and OJ should have been convicted. OJ, however couldn’t change his spots. Whatever happened to Blake after he got away with murder?

    • PatrickHMoore says:

      Yes, he’s a snarky fellow, all right, and witty as Mephistopheles. That’s why I want him to write for us; we need a master of “the snark” since BJW Nashe has moved onto other things.

      I accept that I have to take some ribbing now and then. It can’t be all hearts and flowers on the crime blog.

  12. SCatter says:

    Starks, Blake was sued in civil court by Bakley’s children for a reported final settlement of $2,000,000 last year (down from the $15,000,000 awarded before Blake appealed).

    I found it amusing that her children contended that her death led them to financial hardship, considering she made her living by scamming rich men (with very poor eyesight, apparently).

  13. Chris says:

    Wow. Patrick, I think a question you posed in one of your commentaries on Karla Homolka (“Is Karla…the Most Hated Woman in North America?”) has been answered.

    No, she’s not. Judging from the vitriol here, Casey Anthony is.

    • PatrickHMoore says:

      You may be right, Chris. I usually think that Anthony, Arias and Honolka are the three most hated in no particular order.

  14. Scatter says:

    I Think there are a few essential differences that put Anthony ahead of Honolka and Arias for the primary spot on the spit at Beelzebub’s Barbeque.

    One is that her crimes were committed against a little girl. Two,that the girl was her own daughter. And three, unlike our other rotisserie candidates, she walked away.

    Pass the barbeque sauce.

    • Rick says:

      Can I have your recipe, Scatter? Or is it Hannibal Lecter’s proprietary formula?

      • Scatter says:

        I wish I could Rick. But eye of newt is getting so hard to find these days.

        • Rick says:

          Scatter – I love your sense of humor! Welcome to the blog. :)

          • Scatter says:

            I appreciate that Rick, especially since I may have broken my own record for making myself a nuisance to our host. Pity my wife.She held the previous record.

            BTW, I cling tenaciously to my faith (and no, it’s not the Westboro variety).I also cling tenaciously to my “Complete Laurel And Hardy DVD Collection”. Without those, I could never survive the horrors documented here.

          • Rick says:

            Scatter – Are you also a fan of Abbott & Costello and their skit “Who’s on First”? That’s actually very clever and funny.

  15. Scatter says:

    Love A&C!! Also have all their movies on DVD as well.

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