commentary by Patrick H. Moore

One of the big problems with doing heavy drugs is that sooner or later either you or somebody you know is going to wind up dead. And like it says in the Bible, “You don’t know the minute or the hour.” In a sense, you might almost be better off if you’re the one who winds up dead. Then, disposing of your corpse is somebody else’s problem.

elsie6Being confronted with this problem has always been a hassle, but in our modern era of advanced Social Media is all the tougher. Now you not only face the thorny problem of disposing of the stiff, but you also gotta decide (and quickly) how best to inform the cyber-world. Do you simply post it on FB and be done with it? Or do you tweet? Instagram is always an option. You can even Pin It which does seem fitting because photos of dead bodies are very common on Pinterest.

Continue reading »

 

commentary by Patrick H. Moore

Okay, so you’ve gone and cheated on your husband/wife/boyfriend/girlfriend. Furthermore, it was just a quick-hitter, a one-time-thing. So the question then becomes: to confess or not to confess?

Most American men would probably say confessing is a bad idea, for after all, what good will it do other than to perhaps salve your conscience? Generally speaking, confession can only hurt the cuckolded partner. I can’t speak for the women, I don’t know what they would recommend, though perhaps their opinions would vary.

Continue reading »

 

posted by Patrick H. Moore

Not all serial killers are weird like Charles Manson or Jeffrey Dahmer.  Or at least they’re not totally weird. They may even have redeeming features. A surprising number of the multiple slayers who are washed up on the rocks of justice and are serving lifetime prison terms, or are languishing on Death Row, once had families and children, allegedly presided at backyard barbecues and may have even gone to PTA meetings. Others were young men just coming of age who made mistakes they couldn’t undo.

Continue reading »

 

commentary by Patrick H. Moore

In trying to make sense out of the wobbly world of crime, we’re occasionally confronted by a case both gruesome and strange that makes us shake our heads and ask, “What was he/she thinking?” This comes up frequently in cases involving children whether it’s the schoolyard bullying syndrome or teens doing crazy things like locking their parents in their room and setting the house on fire.

Continue reading »

 

commentary by Patrick H. Moore

A year ago, I wrote about the rage I felt over the actions of a male pediatric nurse when my daughter, who was a toddler, was in the hospital for a medical procedure at Stanford Children’s Hospital in Northern California. The medical issue, which I won’t go into, was very serious, and my wife and I were pleased by the solicitous treatment she received from a cluster of kind and caring female pediatric nurses.

I was utterly displeased, however, by the actions of a male pediatric nurse who I observed stroking my daughter’s little arms a couple of times for no reason other than he wanted to. There was nothing overtly sexual about his actions, but nonetheless, I was furious and would have undoubtedly punched him out if I thought I could get away with it. As it was, I told him to take his effing hands off her.

Continue reading »

 

by Darcia Helle

A recent article in Rolling Stone magazine titled The Entrapment of Jesse Snodgrass prompted me to write this piece. I wanted to keep my professional distance but, when I sat down to write, I found it nearly impossible to keep my outrage from bleeding into my words. This is Jesse’s story, though it could belong to anyone.

In August 2012, Jesse Snodgrass was a 17-year-old high school student at Chaparral High School in Temecula, California. Jesse was troubled, though not in the way that leads to criminal problems. Jesse has Asperger’s syndrome, which is a form of autism. He also suffers with Tourette’s syndrome and bipolar disorder. Because of these challenges, Jesse was an easy target for bullies. Throughout his school years, he’d been taunted, teased, and called “retard”. The anxiety caused Jesse to turn inward and injure himself; he would bang his head, scratch and punch himself during the worst times.

Continue reading »

 

commentary by Patrick H. Moore

There’s no finer place than the Wild Wild West. Where else can a 9-year-old year munch down on a yummy burger (my mouth is watering) and then proceed to the firing range to receive expert instruction on how to fire: not a cap pistol (do they even exist anymore), not a Walt Disney toy flintlock (like I had when I was a young boy in the Midwest), not a Lady Derringer (which would be kind of cool to shoot if you think about it), not a Smith & Wesson .38 caliber revolver (a tried and true firearm if there ever was one), not a 30-30 deer rifle (a staple amongst the German farmers I grew up with), but rather an honest-to-goodness Uzi SubMach (capable of firing 950 rounds per minute)? Talk about a kick in the head!

Continue reading »

 

commentary by Patrick H. Moore

It’s a fact that the perpetrators in most child molestation cases are either family members or relatives of the victim, or close family friends. In the cases I’ve worked on, the molester is usually an evil uncle. There are exceptions to this rule, however, as a horrifying case out of Philadelphia reminds us.

Continue reading »

 

commentary by Patrick H. Moore

Even children with loving and responsible parents sometimes get a little fed up with mom and dad and their demands. Imagine what it would be like if both your parents had a history of psychosis and serious mental illness and were liable to “goes off their rockers” at any moment. Now, to make it all the worse, imagine you are only six weeks old, a helpless infant named Faith, and your mother experiences a complete psychotic breakdown. You wouldn’t have any way to protect yourself.

Continue reading »

 

compiled by Patrick H. Moore

This compelling yet horrifying array of 51 disturbing quotes from 19 disturbed serial killers is drawn from the public domain. Although I’m quite certain that each and everyone of these killers had their moments of intense terror and loneliness, I am struck by the fact that some of them seem far more unhappy than others. For example, Aileen Wuornos may have been one of the most unhappy women that every lived. Compared to her, suave Mr. Bundy seems to to be feeling only moderate pain, while the deadly Dahmer appears to be consumed with guilt over his actions. What all of this boils down to is that although serial killers may well shares many basic personality characteristics, they are all different which makes it tough to generalize effectively about them.

Continue reading »

 

Looking for something?

Use the form below to search the site:


Still not finding what you're looking for? Drop a comment on a post or contact us so we can take care of it!

Visit our friends!

A few highly recommended friends...

    Set your Twitter account name in your settings to use the TwitterBar Section.