commentary by Patrick H. Moore

Folks don’t make a great deal of money in Buffalo, Missouri, a town of less than 4,000 people in the Ozark Mountains in the southwestern part of the state. The median income for a household is less than $20,000 and close to 30 per cent of the town’s population lives in poverty. There’s one thing you can count on, though. Except during the periodic droughts, you can count on plenty of home-cooked meth being readily available. These days, Missouri, and particularly the Ozarks, is known as the world’s home-cooked meth capital.

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by Rick Stack

It is a rare occasion when both the defendant and the surviving family of a victim agree on the sentence imposed by a judge. That atypical scenario appears to have occurred on Tuesday in a Johannesburg, South Africa courtroom during the sentencing of fallen Olympian Oscar Pistorius. Judge Thokozile Matilda Masipa imposed a 5-year prison sentence for “culpable homicide” (analogous to manslaughter in the U.S.) against Pistorius in the killing of his 29-year-old girlfriend and model, Reeva Steenkamp, on Valentine’s night 2013, as well as a 3-year suspended sentence for separate weapons charges. In a blow to the NRA, Pistorius also was declared unfit to possess a gun in the future.

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commentary by Patrick H. Moore

Pulchritude is a word you don’t hear much anymore. When I have heard it used it’s generally been in reference to “female pulchritude” which I always assumed meant “female physiognomy” or feminine physique, but in looking it up online it’s simple a middle English word derived from the Latin and it simply means “beautiful”. Or as one proponent of pulchritude put it, “My girlfriend is the most pulchritudinous woman in the woman in the world.”

However, after deep thought, it seems to me that pulchritude could be applied to both sexes not to mention transgender people. Thus, if a man and a woman make beautiful music together we could say that pulchritude is meeting pulchritude.

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by Bob Couttie

It was 11.45pm on 11 October this year when room attendant Elias Gallamos entered Room 1 at the Celzone Lodge, a short-time hotel, in Olongapo, Philippines, for the second time that evening. Fifteen minutes earlier he had seen a pair of slippers at the bathroom door and assumed that the attractive young woman who had checked in around 45 minutes earlier with a white male was still there although the male had apparently already left. The slippers were still there, unmoved.

Looking into the bathroom, Gallamos found a female figure, head leaning against the toilet bowl. A cream-coloured sheet covered her part-naked body. She had been badly beaten and there were bite marks on her body. There were grip marks on her neck and the water found in her lungs showed that she had been drowned.

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compiled by Patrick H. Moore

On February 6, 1943, the famed film actor Errol Flynn, after a month-long trial, was acquitted of the rapes and statutory rapes of Peggy Satterlee and Betty Hansen. The jury deliberated for 13 hours before returning with their unanimous not guilty verdict. According to Trove, Flynn, who had been uncharacteristically subdued throughout the lengthy ordeal, shouted gleefully upon hearing the good news:

Gosh! I feel like whooping!

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commentary by Patrick H. Moore

“Neither a borrower nor a lender be.” Sage advice that is perhaps rarely followed. Here’s another maxim to live by: “Don’t be a stalker.” Just don’t, even if you have to move to another city or to a whole different country. Get help, therapy. Find someone you trust and let them bind and gag you until the impulse passes.

I say this because although I could be wrong, it is possible that here on All Things Crime Blog we may have a reader or two who – given the right unfortunate set of circumstances – could conceivably succumb to the stalking impulse.

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by Lise LaSalle

Eminem’s song for daughter Hailie – Now it don’t feel like the world’s on my shoulders, Everyone’s leaning on me, ‘Cause my baby knows that her daddy’s a soldier, Nothing can take her from me

Little Haleigh Cummings was reported missing from her family’s Satsuma, Florida, home on February 10, 2009. She was 5-years-old at the time with blond hair and brown eyes. The police in this small north Florida community had nothing else to go on, but this physical description.

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by BJW Nashe

The first two photographs in this post are courtesy of San Francisco-based photographer Frank Gaglione. You can see more of Frank’s work at his website.

The fact that some women and some men are strangely attracted to convicted serial killers, to the point of entering into relationships with them, and even occasionally marrying them, may lead you to question whatever faith in humanity you think you still possess. It’s an odd phenomenon that certainly makes for good copy. Indeed, the stories about individuals who have grown infatuated with Ted Bundy and Richard Ramirez tend to read like a darkly comedic Chuck Palahniuk novel.

What’s going on with these people?

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by Lise LaSalle

brid2

On September 22, 2014, Gilles Pimparé, 60, was denied parole for the sixth time by the Parole Board of Canada following a hearing held at La Macaza Institution, a medium security penitentiary in the Laurentians. He first applied for parole in 2001 and has never succeeded in obtaining a release.

In 1979, which was the International Year of the Child, Pimparé and his accomplice Normand Guérin, killed Chantal Dupont, 15, and Maurice Marcil, 14, by throwing them off the Jacques Cartier Bridge in Montreal after having raped Chantal and strangled them both. The two men were found guilty of first-degree murder in 1984.

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commentary by Patrick H. Moore

From our vantage point here in the USA, it is easy to assume that the criminal justice systems of other nations are similar to ours, with the exception that we are guiltily aware of the fact that many nations have long since deleted the Death Penalty from its roster of potential sentences.

Generally speaking, I have observed that the British system, like ours, is not reluctant to hand out harsh sentences for violent crimes that result in death, including life in prison in some instances.

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